• Penni from Up Up n Away

Babies : Health & Daily Care

Updated: Feb 5, 2021


babies health daily care nutrition doctor immunisations vaccinations development growth sleep

General health checks


By the time your baby is 3 months old, you have probably had many visits with healthcare professionals. Your general health checks become a little bit more staggered from the 3 month mark, with a scheduled visit with your doctor going from around once a month (if not more) to just under once every 3 months.


At 4 months, your doctor will monitor your baby’s growth, physical and emotional development, feeding, sleeping and physical awareness; as well as perform tests to determine their eyesight, hearing, heart, and lungs are all within healthy ranges.

At 6 months, the doctor will again monitor your baby’s physical, emotional, and intellectual development. He or she will also talk to you about nutrition, dental care, crawling and mobility.


At 9 months, the monitoring will continue. It will also include a screening test that can help with the identification of developmental delays in speech and language. Healthcare professionals also usually do a blood test around this time too. They will talk to you about the emotional milestones that your baby might be passing, and ways to deal with the separation anxiety that is common around this age.


At 12 months, your doctor will monitor your baby’s growth, physical and emotional development, feeding, sleeping and physical awareness; as well as perform tests to determine their eyesight, hearing, heart and lungs are all within healthy ranges for his or her age. They will discuss with you nutrition, dental care, crawling, walking and mobility; as well as emotional and intellectual development.


Immunisation and vaccinations


Once you have made a decision about your child’s immunisation, your doctor will advise you on what you need to do to ensure your child is up to date with their immunisation as outlined in the national immunisation program (NIP).

Health concerns


Now that you have been a parent for a couple of months you are probably feeling a lot more confident when it comes to the everyday healthcare of your little one. You are probably also a lot more trusting in your own instincts and knowing how to handle the more common of health problems, such as coughs, fevers, colds, and vomiting; and know the warning signs for more serious issues are to look for. You should still not hesitate to contact your health professional if you aren’t sure and are worried.


Signs of serious illness and conditions


Sometimes it is hard to know when your baby’s illness is a serious issue, or if it is a common and minor condition. You should call your doctor, or healthcare professional straight away if your baby exhibits any of the following:

  • Your baby has a high temperature or fever of over 38°C.

  • Your baby has a fit, or convulsion.

  • Your baby vomits green fluid.

  • Your baby has a lump in the groin area, or hernia.

  • Your baby has an apneic episode (stops breathing for more than 15 seconds)

There are also other signs that can indicate serious illness, if your baby’s behaviour indicates more than one of the following you should seek medical advice immediately:

  • Excessive drowsiness (Less alert than usual, less aware of surroundings than usual).

  • Decreased activity (considerably less active, less interested in activities).

  • Breathing difficulty (coughing, short shallow breath, labored breathing).

  • Poor circulation (baby is pale, hands and feet might be cold to touch).

  • Feeding less (around half their normal intake).

  • Less wet nappies (less than 4 in 24-hour period).

When to see your doctor